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Video Description:

Join our character Gerry in his hometown by the sea as he investigates the values of common US coins. Gerry buys ice cream, dill pickles, and even describes a little bit about the history of the presidents whose faces adorn US coins!

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1 - NUMBEROCK's US Coins Resources Packet
2 - NUMBEROCK's Counting Money Task Cards
Aligned With Common Core Standards 2.MD.8 and TEK Standards 1.4A, 1.4B, 1.4C, 2.5A, 2.5B & 3.4C

The Value of US Coins Song Lyrics:

One penny is worth one cent; one nickel's worth five of them.
One dime has a value of ten; one quarter's worth twenty-five cents.
Five pennies make a nickel (in cents, it's worth five).
Two nickels make ten cents (that means they're worth a dime).
A quarter's twenty-five pennies, but let's make it shorter...
two dimes and a nickel also equal a quarter.

I bought one delicious dill pickle for two dimes, a quarter, and a nickel.
To find out how much I spent, I counted them up cent by cent.
I started with the quarter; it was worth twenty-five cents.
Each dime was worth ten, so I added both of them;
got thirty-five, forty-five, and then there was a nickel...
I added five, and paid fifty cents for the pickle.

(Chorus)

I bought an ice cream in the summertime with four pennies, three quarters, and a dime. The ice cream lady looked in silence, and then she counted up my cents.
She counted the three quarters - twenty-five, fifty, seventy-five -
then she added the dime.
The ten cents made eighty-five, and the four pennies left made it eighty-nine.
So it was eighty-nine cents for the ice cream; I ate until my shirt popped at the seam!

(Chorus)

On the penny is the sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln;
he wrote The Gettysburg Address and The Emancipation Proclamation.
The third president, Thomas Jefferson, is on the nickel (or five cents);
he was the main author of the Declaration of Independence.
The dime has Franklin Delano Roosevelt, president thirty-two;
he instituted The New Deal and led America through World War II.
Finally, on the quarter is the first president, George Washington;
he was the Commander-in-Chief during the American Revolution.

(Chorus)

Five pennies make a nickel (in cents, it's worth five).
Two nickels make ten cents (that means they're worth a dime).
A quarter's twenty- five pennies, but let's make it shorter...
two dimes and a nickel also equal a quarter.

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