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Slater is a very hungry alligator who is always comparing numbers and eating the number that is greater! Watch him walk around his hometown marsh and swamp in this greater than less than video as he eats human food and goes apple picking for the largest apple he can find. On a somewhat unrelated side note, Slater has an Australian accent and will get quite chatty towards the end of this comparing numbers video!

Aligned With:

Common Core Standards ( CCSS )
K.CC.B.5
Count to answer "how many" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle
K.CC.C.6
Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.

1.NBT.B.2
Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
1.NBT.B.2.a
10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a "ten."
1.NBT.B.2.b
The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
1.NBT.B.2.c
The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

2.NBT.A.1
Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
2.NBT.A.1.a
100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred."
2.NBT.A.1.b
The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
2.NBT.A.4
Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones...

TEKS Supporting Standards Coming Soon

* UK Age Range:
| Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 |
KS1 - KS2 Maths